When a customer files a claim, the quality of their customer experience can have serious consequences for their loyalty and long-term value to the insurer. Historically, claims contact centers have been regarded as cost centers for insurers, a place where hard-won premium dollars are spent. But what if insurers took a different approach and viewed their claims contact center as an opportunity to achieve the ultimate balance of providing customer satisfaction and lowering claims losses?

In a report titled “Transforming the Insurance Contact Center Experience,” my colleague John McNally recommends that insurers establish metrics specific to their call center needs. Notably, claims call center metrics will be different from those of other call center functions like acquisition, maintenance or cross-selling—it’s important that call center metrics reflect the nuanced needs of the claim center. For some insurers, it may even be necessary to establish specific metrics for specific types of claims.

Our recent report outlines seven key claims call center metrics. I’ll discuss three of them today:

  • Average handle time for initial loss reporting. While it’s important to minimize overall handling times, insurers must balance efficiency and emotional care for the customer. Handling times can be improved by having call center personnel ask the right claims intake questions, and taking steps to improve the reporting experience.
  • Average handle time (with claim) for initial loss reporting. Again, handling times can be improved by asking the right claim questions. Insurers may also choose to refine their claims intake process to further optimize the customer experience.
  • Average handle time (without claim). Smart, specific questions can help call center personnel determine early on if a claim doesn’t need to be filed, or if there isn’t sufficient information to file one.

Join me next week as I look at four more metrics to help insurers optimize their claims contact center customer experience.

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